Clifford “Soup” Corwin: His Legacy Will Live On

Submitted by Quinault Indian Nation

Clifford “Soup” Corwin, 100, passed peacefully in his sleep Saturday February 10, 2018. At the time of his passing, Soup was the longest living Quinault Tribal member and exercised his treaty rights well into his 90’s. Prior to his 100th birthday celebration in October, Quinault Indian Nation President Fawn Sharp said this about Soup, “He is a highly esteemed elder who has many stories to tell, and whose wisdom is legendary. Our entire Tribe has great respect for him.” Tribal leaders throughout the region respected Soup and his legacy of wisdom and leadership will be felt for generations to come.

Clifford Corwin
Clifford “Soup” Corwin was the longest living Quinault Tribal member prior to his passing. Photo courtesy: Quinault Indian Nation

Born in Bay Center, WA, Soup spent most of his life on the coast. As a young man, he learned to hunt, fish, and trap from his grandfather Alfred Pickernell. He started working at the age of 16 picking oysters and clam digging. Chasing his love of fishing, he traveled as far north as the Canadian border and throughout Oregon coast to the south. Clifford and his wife, Ethel, moved to Taholah in the 1960’s where he fished commercially on the Quinault for nearly 50 years.

An avid lover of the outdoors, Soup fished and hunted throughout his life and loved it until the end. His knowledge and love of the land will be missed.

Born October 17, 1917, to Maude Pickernell and Ben Corwin, he is preceded in death by his wife, Ethel “Ishky” Bastian, who died in 2002. He is survived by his son Clifford “Spud” Corwin (Laurie); eight grandchildren, fourteen great grandchildren and four great-great grandchildren

Visitation will be at the Coleman Mortuary on Thursday, February 15, 2018 from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM. A graveside service will be at 10:30 AM on Friday, February 16, 2018, at Hoquiam’s Sunset Memorial Park. A celebration of life will follow at 1:00 PM at the Community Center in Taholah. Arrangements are by the Coleman Mortuary in Hoquiam.

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