Submitted by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The 2022-23 Washington recreational razor clam season remains closed on ALL beaches. Marine toxin levels (specifically domoic acid) have increased above the action level. We will continue testing, but at this time do not have an estimate of when digging can proceed.

Below are the most recent toxin levels provided by Washington Department of Health (WDOH) for Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP) or Domoic Acid, Paralytic Shellfish Poison (PSP) and Diarrhetic Shellfish Poison (DSP).

Before a beach can be opened for the harvest of razor clams, WDOH protocol requires that all razor clam samples collected from that beach must test under the action level, in two tests that are at least 10 days apart. The action levels are 20 ppm for domoic acid; 80 µg/100g for PSP; and 16 µg/100g for DSP.

Note that only razor clam meat tissue is tested.

We collected razor clams on 11/14 from the two beaches (Copalis and Mocrocks) that we thought had the best chance of opening sometime soon. As you can see below, the levels on these beaches remain above the action level. This means there will be no harvest on any beaches for the Thanksgiving low tide series. More samples from all beaches will be collected next week.

These results along with previous results are posted on our website.

These samples were all collected on 11/14/2022.

Copalis Area (north)

  • domoic acid = 26 ppm
  • PSP = none detected
  • DSP = <1 ug/100g

Copalis Area (middle)

  • domoic acid = 21 ppm
  • PSP = none detected
  • DSP = 1 ug/100g

Copalis Area (south)

  • domoic acid =   31 ppm
  • PSP = none detected
  • DSP = <1 ug/100g

Mocrocks (north)

  • domoic acid = 26 ppm
  • PSP = none detected
  • DSP = none detected

Mocrocks (middle)

  • domoic acid = 26 ppm
  • PSP = none detected
  • DSP = <1 ug/100g

Mocrocks (south)

  • domoic acid = 24 ppm
  • PSP = none detected
  • DSP = <1 ug/100g

For more information on razor clams, including how seasons are set, population sampling techniques and how to dig, clean and cook razor clams please see here.

For more information on marine toxins, see the following link:

Print Friendly